Qiu Qiu
game

Player of the Year Ladies: Liv Boeree Closing in Qiu Qiu on Kelly Minkin

 

 

A lot has happened since we last took a look at the GPI Player of the Year Ladies’ (PoYL) race. With just six weeks left of the year, the tension is building up, and nothing is decided yet. Last year it was business as usual with Vanessa Selbst claiming the top spot for the third year in a row. This year though, everything points to a new leader of the pack.

 

At the end of August Parx Casino ambassador Esther Taylor-Brady (E-Tay) was leading the way with Kelly Minkin hot on her heels, and just a few points separating the two players. Novelist and playwright Rachel Kranz was in third, Canadian poker pro Xuan Liu in fourth and two-time WSOP bracelet winner Loni Harwood in fifth.

 

TOP FIVE

About two months – and a very busy poker schedule – later Kelly Minkin has reclaimed the top spot. At the start of September she finished in 5th place in a WPT Legends of Poker event, and in October she took 10th in a WSOP Circuit event at Horseshoe Casino in Hammond. The two deep runs secured Minkin an extra 300 points and the top spot.

 

Meanwhile Liv Boeree has had a great post WSOP. Mid-August Boeree was sitting in 19th place of the rankings, but as we predicted, this was bound to change as soon as the EPT season 12 kicked off in Barcelona. And it did! First Boeree finished in 3rd place in the €25,500 High Roller for €391,000, then she continued to Isle of Man where she took 6th in the more modest £1,100 High Roller. At EPT Malta she had another deep run, finishing in 3rd place of a hyperturbo event (€38,680), and just a week ago she finished in top 75 of …

Zyn pouches
business

Lynch voices Zyn pouchesconcern with budget increases

 

 

Gov. John Lynch is ringing the warning bell over the extent of tax increases and spending contained in a two-year, $10.4 billion state budget facing a showdown vote in the House of Representatives next week.

 

The proposed House Finance Committee budget would increase state tax and fee spending by $178 million over what Lynch proposed Feb. 15, according to its chairman, Durham Democratic Rep. Marjorie Smith.

 

It also raised cigarette taxes higher than Lynch asked for and would raise the tax on real estate transactions to support a popular land and building preservation effort.

“I think as this budget gets into the Senate, I believe they are going to take a serious look at the add-ons that are coming out of the House,” Lynch said Friday during an editorial board meeting at The Telegraph.

 

Meanwhile, Lynch said he’s open to accepting changes if they are needed to “clarify the intent” of his proposed amendment to the state Constitution over education funding.

Former Supreme Court Justice Chuck Douglas urged lawmakers this week to add to Lynch’s amendment that lawmakers have “broad latitude” in deciding how education aid is given out.

 

“I am open to a word or two that would clarify the intent of the amendment going forward, and that certainly could happen,” Lynch began, adding Douglas was correct the Supreme Court used those words in previous decisions.

 

The state Senate will take up his controversial amendment next week.

 

Republican critics predict he’ll get the 15 votes or 60 percent super-majority needed to pass the amendment in the upper chamber.

 

His task in the House, if it gets that far, will be tougher.

 

Lynch said court decisions don’t allow the state to funnel extra education aid to needy communities within the …